Thursday, November 1, 2007

The November Harvest Calendar


It’s a funny time at the markets right now. The sun is lower, the shadows are longer, and all the crops you’d expect this time of year are in evidence, but so are many lingering reminders of summer. Of course, it’s all due to the unusually warm autumn New York’s had. Good tomatoes are still in abundance, as are eggplants, green beans, and even a few everbearing strawberries – strange enough in November alone, never mind piled next to the parsnips, chestnuts, and brussel sprouts.


The River Garden’s fresh flowers seem to be behaving more appropriately, which unfortunately means they’re almost all gone. But there are still gloriously fragrant buckets of fresh eucalyptus for sale next to the wreaths of dried wheat, chili peppers, and lavender from the year’s second harvest. And elsewhere there are domed carpets of chrysanthemums – expectant harbingers to next month’s cyclamen, amaryllis, and poinsettias.


Barring yet another Indian summer, many of autumn’s harvests do finish this month. By November’s end, the field grown apples, beets, broccoli, brussel sprouts, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, fennel, mesclun, and pears will all be harvested, so make the most of these crops while you can.


It’s also a good time to enjoy leeks, onions, potatoes, winter squash, and turnips, because, though we’ll probably be dipping into cold storage reserves for these crops by mid-month, the produce will still be as fresh as it’s going to be until next year, if you catch my drift. And pay particular attention to pumpkins. Their harvest is over now, and they’re only available from cold storage for the next 4 weeks.


As always, this information is available in the sidebar harvest calendar over there on the right all month. The information comes from a guide published by the CENYC, which runs the Greenmarket & New Farmer Development Project. Of course, the best way to familiarize yourself with what's in season where you live is to visit farmer's markets in your area at least every couple of weeks. I truly learn the most of all from the farmers themselves. So ask questions at the market – it’s the best way to find out which crops are not only available, but at their peak. To locate markets near you in the US, check the Zip or City Quick Search at Local Harvest.

Happy autumn, and happy November!

21 comments:

Lucy said...

I love it. That scent in the air and the produce, the produce!

And fennel season too. Final meal? Mine would be fennel, braised in sweet wine and butter on a base of puy lentils scented with cinnamon and bay leaves. Autumn is the best time of the year.

Simona said...

A nice set of photos. I particularly like the Brussels sprouts.

Gloria said...

Beautiful Pictures Amanda!! I like them, I enjoy when I go to the Market to buy, I like to smell the fruits and veggis. xxxGloria

Hannah said...

Oh this post is so lovely and autumnal - thanks Amanda!

Stash said...

There were heirloom tomatoes as late as last weekend.

I think I should have gotten a couple of pounds and preserved them. Oh well...

Joanna said...

I love the way the broccoli is even more beautiful than than chrysanthemums!

Lovely photos

Joanna

winedeb said...

Nice Amanda! I have been in contact with the friends I made at the farmers market in Ohio while I was staying there this summer. And yes, due to the warm fall, the market is still in full swing with even some lettuces still available! Makes one wonder about global warming ???
Now, what are you going to "whip up" with that beautiful purple cauliflower?? Cheers!

Cynthia said...

Your blog is always a delight to read.

Christina said...

Thank you for doing what you do to encourage eating thoughtfully. Your photographs prove, time and time again, that eating locally and seasonally not only tastes better, it looks better too.

Figs Olives Wine said...

Lucy, the scent's incredible - you're so right! This time of year I buy a cup of hot apple cider as soon as I get to the market in the morning. That way I can sip as I make my rounds - such a lovely ritual! Your last meal sounds like heaven to me! Something I'd love to try myself. It's rainy here today - perfect for braising and puttering in the kitchen! Thanks for such a great idea.

Simona, thank you! Me too, by the way. There's something so irresistible about all those little globes on their giant stalks. It's almost space age, yet entirely comforting at the same time, isn't it?

Gloria, thank you my dear! The smells are beautiful in the autumn, aren't they? So earthy and invigorating. It's my favorite time of year!

Hannah, thanks so much! I'm really so pleased you like!

Stash, we've still got them here - it's amazing to me! I know I should buy them, but I'm too focused on autumn! I waited for it for so long, that I'm entirely one-track now I'm afraid!

Joanna, me too! Some of the vegetables this time of year have the most extraordinary jewel tones - so rich. Thanks Joanna!

Winedeb, thank you! This weather is scary, isn't it? The availability this late in the year is so bizarre. I must get myself some of that purple cauliflower before it's gone - and I think I'll roast it! A soup that color might just be too daunting hehe.

Cynthia, as is yours! Thanks so much! You're lovely to say so.

Christina, you're really so kind to say that! I feel very lucky to have these markets near me with so many incredible farmers - its easy to get inspired when you see so much beautiful produce.

Joanne Rendell said...

beautiful photos, amanda. makes me want to run to the farmer's market now. although, boy, hasn't it turned cold so suddenly in NY?!

Joanne Rendell said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Joan said...

Beautiful photos and writing. I really felt I was there!

Susan in Italy said...

Such glorious photos of the best time at the market. I just love the market in fall. It was at an outdoor market where I first discovered how brussels sprouts grow on thise tall stalks. It freaked me out!

Gloria said...

Amanda if you have some time pass to my blog and look, because I put a fig leafs recipe, maybe you know and maybe not. I knew at Grecia have similars recipe to this, this is of my mother's in law. xxxxGloria

sognatrice said...

Gorgeous colors; we haven't even gotten any good broccoli here yet :(

Figs Olives Wine said...

Jo, thank you! Wasn't the switch sudden? I swear we're down to 2 seasons now, which is such a bummer as the other 2 were my favorites! Oh well, at least it's not scorching anymore ; )

Joan, thank you! That's very kind of you to say, and I'm so pleased you like!

Susan, thank you!It's my favorite time of the year for markets too, and I learned the same way! I thought they looks like something from outer space! So peculiar the first time you realize that's how it works!

Gloria, I definitely will! Thanks so much for the heads up!

Sognatrice, I'm sure it's on its way! Ad I'm sure that Calabrian broccoli (like everything else) must taste divine! Can't wait to see what you do with it.

Wendy said...

A lovely round up! Feeling very inspired now. :)

Gloria said...

Dear Amanda only to say you thanks, because when you comments in my blog "leaves" and not leafs this make me think. Is not a mistery that is hard to me sometimes translate all. (My mother's in law didn't speak english, so I translate the recipes. I investigate at Libeneses's site and they say "grape's leaves", so I prefer this to the recipe. Thanks. Gloria

Figs Olives Wine said...

Wendy, thank you! I'm so glad you like. It's such a great time of year at the market, isn't it? Can't wait to catch up on your site when I'm back!

Gloria, oh my goodness, I didn't even notice! I love your writing, and I would never dream of correcting you! I'm just so impressed you can write in 2 languages! It puts me to shame.

Gloria said...

Amanda, I know you are, so kind but I appreciate when someones help me, really the Libaneses speak abou"grapes leaves" and I didn't idea, the thing is we learn averyday. I hope you have a nice time and really thanks. Gloria

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